Gary C. Johnson, P.S.C.
Call us to Speak with an Attorney.
Toll Free 1.866.606.4316
Local 1.606.262.4551
This is an Advertisement

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy

What should I do after a serious car accident in Kentucky?

When you get into a car accident in Kentucky, chances are that you are feeling emotionally shaken if not also physically injured. If you are in an emergency situation, your priority should always be to seek medical care immediately. Otherwise, there are a few things you can do to ensure that you are in compliance with the law and protect your best interests.

According to the Kentucky State Police, there were 145,974 traffic accidents in 2013, more than 23,000 of which caused serious injuries or death. Any incident that causes a death or fatality must be reported to law enforcement, as should any accident that causes damage to a vehicle that renders it inoperable.

After notifying the authorities, you will next want to call your insurance company. As the Kentucky Department of Insurance points out, the state abides by a “no-fault” policy that means you will almost always file a car accident claim with your own provider, even if the other driver is responsible. You will want to collect the following pieces of information:

  •        The name and contact information of the other driver
  •        The other driver’s insurance information
  •        Where and when the accident happened
  •        Pictures of the scene including pictures of any damage to the vehicle

Some accidents may merit a lawsuit. If you are filing a personal injury claim, Kentucky requires you to do so within a year of the accident. If the claim seeks only property damage, you have two years under the statute of limitations. You should also be aware that Kentucky is a comparative fault state, which means a judge could take into consideration your level of responsibility for the incident when determining compensation.

While this information may be useful, it should not be taken as legal advice.

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information