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Can an accident cause a stroke?

All drivers in Kentucky, yourself included, have the unfortunate possibility of getting into an accident someday. You may be wondering what injuries you could face if you ever get into a crash. However, did you know that sometimes, injuries can occur days or even weeks after an accident?

One of the most dangerous examples of a delayed accident injury is a stroke. The National Center for Biotechnology Information posted a study questioning if strokes could be caused by accidents. While it is known that strokes have caused accidents before due to the fact that they confuse and disrupt the driver’s ability to think, some question if it’s possible for the reverse to occur.

In short, yes. It is entirely possible for an accident to cause a stroke in a patient. This is especially if there is traumatic brain injury involved. In fact, your chance of suffering from a stroke can increase up to ten times if you have had traumatic brain injury in the past. This can include concussions, but any sort of damage done to the brain can count. Risks grow even larger if a skull fracture occurred.

Additionally, the chance for stroke isn’t a quickly acting thing. Sometimes, accident-induced strokes can occur up to three months after the initial impact.

Therefore, accidents can cause strokes and anyone who has suffered from skull fractures, concussions or other injuries to the brain should be on the lookout for potential warning signs of oncoming strokes. The faster the risk is identified, the better it is for you.

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